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The Emmanuel movement (Boston, 1904-1929) : the origins of group treatment and the assault on lay psychotherapy by Sanford Gifford

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Published by Francis Countway Library of Medicine, Distributed by the Harvard University Press in Boston, Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Worcester, Elwood, -- 1862-1940.,
  • Emmanuel movement.,
  • Group psychotherapy -- History.,
  • Psychotherapy -- United States -- History.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 133-145) and index.

Other titlesOrigins of group treatment and the assault on lay psychotherapy
StatementSanford Gifford.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRZ400 .F54 1997
The Physical Object
Paginationxiii. 155 p. :
Number of Pages155
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21348875M
ISBN 100674251113
OCLC/WorldCa39465360

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The Emmanuel Movement. From: Primer on Alcoholism, by Marty Mann, Chapter 7, pages Belief in the possibility of recovery is growing apace today, but it had a slow and feeble beginning not so very long ago. The Emmanuel Movement and the Jacoby Club, founded in Boston in and , were enormously popular movements, which had thirty years of impressive success in treating alcoholics. Like Alcoholics Anonymous, they were also based on fellowship among recovering alcoholics and involved a synthesis between lay psychological counseling and Cited by: 8. "The Emmanuel Movement" was a name given by the contemporary press to a combined method of group and individual psychotherapy introduced in by the Rev. Elwood Worcester, Rector of the Emmanuel Church in Boston. This treatment method for the common neuroses, offered to the public free of charge and open to all social classes and religious denominations, was first welcomed with great. The Emmanuel Movement in a New England Town (New York: C. P. Putnam’s Sons, ), p. 2. Thomas P. Boyd, The How and the Why of the Emmanuel Movement, A Hand book on Psycho-Therapeutics (San Francisco: The Emmanuel Institute of Health, ), p. xiv.

"The Emmanuel Movement" was a name given by the contemporary press to a combined method of group and individual psychotherapy introduced in by the Rev. Elwood Worcester, Rector of the Emmanuel Church in Boston. The Emmanuel Movement refers to a collaborative effort of Boston physicians and Episcopalian ministers, in the early twentieth century, who purportedly combined aspects of religious faith and. After their divorce, he sought help through the Emmanuel Movement and later wrote a book, The Common Sense of Drinking, in which he described a secularized treatment methodology. He was the first authority to proclaim that there was no cure for alcoholism. [2]Nationality: United States. How and Why of the Emmanuel Movement by Thomas Parker Boyd (Author) ISBN ISBN X. Why is ISBN important? ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The digit and digit formats both work. Format: Paperback.

The Emmanuel Movement was a psychologically-based approach to religious healing introduced in as an outreach of the Emmanuel Church in Boston, practice, the religious element was de-emphasized and the primary modalities were individual and group therapy. Episcopal priests Elwood Worcester and Samuel McComb established a clinic at the church which lasted 23 years and. Book/Printed Material The Emmanuel Movement; a brief history of the new cult, with sermons from prominent ministers and opinions of laymen. Enlarge View 40 images in sequence. Emmanuel movement 10 works Search for books with subject Emmanuel movement. Search. Read. Read. Body, mind and spirit Elwood Worcester Not In Library. Read. Read. Not In Library. Read. Elwood Worcester, 3 books Ray Stannard Baker, 1 book Thomas Parker Boyd, 1 .   The Emmanuel Movement (Boston, –): This is, I repeat, an easy book to read. Gifford writes as if he is a lecturer keeping his eye on the listeners in the back row, anticipating the questions to be raised and trying to answer them in advance. He connects with the reader, and this thin volume can be recommended to physicians and Cited by: 7.